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Sale vs. Sell: What’s the Difference?

When learning American English, certain words may confuse you, especially when they look and sound alike. A case in point would be the words “sale” and “sell.” You may already be mistaking one for the other right now. The primary difference between sale and sell lies in the difference between the potential and actual transaction …

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Aesthetically Pleasing: What It Means to Be Pleasant to the Eye

We recognize beauty when we see it. Each of us vividly remembers encountering something aesthetically pleasing to the eye — we stopped what we were doing and stared at the sunset, a face, a pet, or a painting. We were so captivated we did not ask what made it so appealing. Aesthetically pleasing refers to …

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There Were or There Was: Differences in Context and Use

The English language is riddled with rules and exceptions to those rules, but the use of “there was” and “there were” is relatively straightforward and consistent. As long as you have grasped the basics for the verb “to be,” and you understand plurals, you’ll be able to use these phrases correctly. Both there were and …

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Viewer Discretion is Advised: Meaning and Implications

Viewer discretion is advised is a phrase you have, undoubtedly, heard or seen on television and in movies, but what does it mean? Viewer discretion is advised is a content warning that precedes potentially sensitive content, advising the viewer to use their own discretion or voluntary decision-making power to decide if they should watch it. …

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Has Been or Have Been: Present Perfect Continuous Tense

Knowing when to use what tense is already confusing for anybody learning the English language, let alone understanding the subtle differences within a single tense. For instance, how does one know when to use either “has been” or “have been”? Has been and have been are both used within the present perfect continuous tense. Has …

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Can Two Plural Words Be Used in a Sentence?

Plurals are one of the trickier concepts in the English language to grasp because there are so many irregularities. While plurals may look daunting, they are vital, and knowing how and when to use them is an essential part of learning English. You can use two plurals in a sentence and more if necessary. When …

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