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Plausible vs. Possible: What’s the Difference?

Various nuances in English can be challenging to understand, even for native speakers. For instance, native and second-language speakers sometimes struggle to differentiate between words like “plausible” and “possible” that sound almost identical but have distinct meanings. The main difference between “plausible” and “possible” is that “plausible” means you could make a reasonably valid case …

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Complement or Supplement: What’s the Difference

There are quite a few words that seem similar in meaning in English but that we cannot use interchangeably. Two examples are the words “complement” and “supplement.” Let’s try to understand the difference. Complement means to add something different that makes another item or idea better or goes well with it. Think of it completing the …

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Food vs. Foods: What’s the Difference?

English is often difficult to completely master, even for a native speaker. The English language is continually evolving. While plurals seem straightforward, there are numerous exceptions, such as food and foods; and how to know what the difference is between the two. “Food” is almost always an uncountable noun used to refer to food in …

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Empire vs. Kingdom: What’s the Difference?

While it lasted, the British Empire was the largest empire the world has ever known, and no other empire has yet come close to its grand scale. At its core was the Kingdom of Great Britain, ruling over vast overseas territories. Yet have you ever wondered, “What’s the difference between an empire and a kingdom”? …

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Past Tense of Run: Understanding Regular and Irregular Verb Tenses

It’s important to distinguish between past and present tense in your writing so that your reader understands what is happening now versus what happened days, months, or moments before.  It can be tricky, though, to remember how to do so correctly with irregular verbs. The past tense of “run” is “ran.” In the English language, …

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