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Knowledge on or Knowledge of: Which Is Correct?

Choosing the right preposition to follow a noun can be tricky for English as a second language. Even native speakers often find it hard to know and explain why they choose a particular preposition which “sounds” better than another. For instance, is it “knowledge on” or “knowledge of”? “Knowledge of” is the preferred prepositional phrase …

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High Quality or High-Quality: Understanding When to Use a Hyphen

Some would say hyphens are going the way of dinosaurs, disappearing in favor of compound words. But they are not extinct just yet, so knowing when to use one and when to skip it is important.     The difference between “high-quality” and “high quality” is determined by the location of the noun that the phrase should …

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Doing Well or Doing Good: Can Both Be Correct?

The words “good” and “well” have similar meanings, and many frequently confuse them in casual conversation. A case in point would be the related phrases “doing good” and “doing well.” So what is the difference between doing well and doing good? Both “doing good” and “doing well” are correct in the proper context. “Doing good” …

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Pricey or Pricy: Differences and Usage

There are currently more than 171,146 words in English, a language that is continuously changing and evolving. Since the development of Old English among the 5th-century Anglo-Saxons, the globalization of English has resulted in influences from an abundance of languages and cultures. This worldliness has left its mark in many ways, including variations in word …

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Clearer or More Clear: Understanding the Proper Usage of Degrees of Comparison

Both the word “clearer” and the phrase “more clear” are examples of the comparative form. The comparative form is one of three degrees of comparison in English. The correct choice is typically “clearer,” not “more clear” when using degrees of comparison. When forming the comparative, we usually add the suffix -er to words of one …

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