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Philip Huber

Philip Huber is a graduate of Francis Marion University and a contributing writer, editor, and project manager for Sona Digital Media. His key interests are in history and apologetics, having written for answersingenesis.org in addition to strategiesforparents.com.

Is It Correct to Say “Big Thanks”?

There are many ways you can express selfless, deep appreciation. The most common expression of gratitude is “Thank you,” and there are different versions of it.  It is correct to say “big thanks” as an informal phrase in communication, but “big thanks” is not a complete sentence. It is acceptable to place it with a …

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Is It Correct to Say “Backwards”?

People use some words differently in various situations or depending on where they are from. These variations in usage and the words themselves can confuse learners of any language. For example, is it correct to say “backwards,” or should we use “backward”? We use “backward” as an adjective regardless of region, and this is also …

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13 American Colonies Timeline: Dawn of the Colonial Era

When the American Colonies were ready to declare their Independence from Great Britain in 1776, the Second Continental Congress consisted of representatives from 13 colonies. However, when were each of the American colonies officially established? The English established the first American colony at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607, and the last was Georgia in 1732. Some, …

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Is It Correct to Say “Revise”?

There are many differences between American and British English. Normally, these differences are fun and easy to understand. Occasionally, however, a familiar word appears in an odd context to communicate a meaning you were not aware it could convey, and such is the case with “revise.” It is correct to say “revise” when communicating that …

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