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Mika Stanvliet

Which is Correct “Passed Away” or “Passed On”?

In English, we often use a euphemism to cushion the blow when mentioning something harsh, unpleasant, or embarrassing. One of the most common applications for euphemisms is when discussing death, particularly when talking to children. But is it better to say “passed away” or “passed on” when talking about death? Both the phrases “passed away” …

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Parenthesis or Parentheses: Differences and Correct Usage

As we write, we sometimes find it necessary to add a little more context for the reader. Parenthetical comments are a common way to add a brief aside or more than one aside, but what do we call this? Is it “parenthesis” or “parentheses”? The main difference between “parenthesis” and “parentheses” is that of the …

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Week’s or Weeks’: Singular, Plural, and Possessive

The apostrophe has three functions in English. We use it to form possessive forms of nouns, form the plurals of letters, numbers, and symbols, and show the omission of letters in contractions. Which function or functions does the apostrophe serve in “week’s” and “weeks’”? The apostrophe -s in “week’s” functions to create the possessive form …

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Speaking of Which: Meaning, Grammar, and Proper Usage

In English, in everyday conversation with native speakers, you may come across certain phrases or expressions that you would rarely see in the written form. This written scarcity results from the abundance of expressions borne out of conversational usage, and “speaking of which” is such a phrase. “Speaking of which” is used to introduce extra …

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Everyone’s or Everyones: Differences, Proper Use, & Meaning

A plural noun or pronoun refers to a group of similar objects, things, or ideas. We can form the plural possessive by adding an apostrophe or apostrophe -s to show something belongs to that plural noun pronoun. However, when it comes to pronouns like “everyone,” is it “everyones” or “everyone’s”? The word “everyone’s” is the …

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