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Laura Byrne

Laura is a lifelong English literature nerd. Most of the time, she works as a television journalist with a focus on science, medical and environmental stories. She loves cycling, running (usually accompanied by her large fluffy dog), and cooking up a storm.

Is It Correct to Say “For Which”?

Phrases like “for which” are very common in English speech and writing, but their logic can be difficult to understand and generalize.  It is correct to say “for which” in more formal and generally written contexts as a substitute for the more colloquial “which ___ for.” The phrase “for which” usually relates to a purpose, …

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What Does It Mean When You Say “Anytime”?

You have likely used “anytime” in your spoken language, such as in response to a friend thanking you for a lift. But do you know the correct use and spelling for this common utterance? When you say “anytime,” it means you are referring to a time that you have not precisely defined or agreed upon. …

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Clearer or More Clear: Understanding the Proper Usage of Degrees of Comparison

Both the word “clearer” and the phrase “more clear” are examples of the comparative form. The comparative form is one of three degrees of comparison in English. The correct choice is typically “clearer,” not “more clear” when using degrees of comparison. When forming the comparative, we usually add the suffix -er to words of one …

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In Home or at Home: Which Is the Correct Form?

When speaking or writing in English, subtle differences in phrasing and word choice can make your language appear fluent and accomplished — or it can demonstrate that you don’t have a grasp of English grammar. The correct phrase to use is usually “I am at home.” when you’re speaking about being in your house or …

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General Consensus: Meaning and Usage

English is a language full of idiomatic phrases, many of which have origins in ages past when the world was far different. To a 21st century ear, these phrases can often sound old-fashioned, unnecessarily wordy, and irrelevant. The phrase “general consensus” can be seen as one such old-fashioned idiom. The phrase “general consensus” is often …

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Combatting or Combating: Grammatical Rules for Proper Usage

There are subtle yet significant differences in the spelling of certain words in American English, and spelling the same words in British English. The words combating and combatting are examples of this distinct difference.  In American English, the correct spelling is “combating.” When writing with the British English spelling, the correct form is “combatting.” Choosing …

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